Keiko Yamamoto

Wood Craft by Keiko Yamamoto

Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo

Born in Aomori in 1978, Keiko Yamamoto graduated from Arts and Crafts in Akita in 1999, before graduating in Education at the University of Saga in 2005.

The artist has been exhibiting with groups and solo in Aomori and Akita since 2007, where she won several awards for “TAKAOKA CRAFTS Competition” in 2009, 2010, and 2013.

2011 marks her first solo exhibition in Akita, “Wooden works by Keiko Yamamoto,” and her beginning in Tokyo.

She has participated in the exhibitions: “Furniture and Wood Crafts”, “Jomon x Jomonism Art”, “From Tsugaru to Tsugaru”, “Aomori x Crafts” in Tokyo and Aomori.

After her second solo exhibition “Wooden works by Keiko Yamamoto” in 2013, her talent was exported to London at the exhibition-contest “East-West Art Award” in 2014.

Creation Process

Keiko Yamamoto cuts strips from wood of the thickness of sheets of paper (0.2-0.5mm) and then winds a plurality of types of wood tape, from the central portion outwardly into a spiral. She chooses the color combination and the diameter on the spur of the moment.

Thereafter, the artisan fixes a container to the surface of the spiral to uniformly shave the surface roughness using a knife, then polishes. Finally, she finishes her wooden objects by coating urethane or oil.

Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo
Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo

Inspirations

Keiko Yamamoto is inspired by the wood as thin as paper to extend the possibilities of uses and forms of her art. She applies the methods of “winding”, of “twisting” and “weaving”. For objects of simple beauty, she wants to bring a unique focus to the living space.

Characteristics

To wrap the coil-shaped wooden strips allows the artist to create dishes, vases, and sculptures, as tea utensils. The special shape made by twisting the wood strips is part of the beauty of the craftsmanship and the object.

Also seeking to avoid waste material, the artisan, environment conscious, uses treated wood in strip form rather than wood blocks, to minimize the loss of material.

Finally, weaving certain types of wood strips, each having a different color, allows obtaining a variation of natural tones, which adds uniqueness to each object.

 

Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo
Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo
Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo

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Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo
Keiko Yamamoto Takenobu Tokyo